AutoDeploy

Objective 8.1: Deploy ESXi Hosts Using Auto Deploy

So I have skipped a few sections dealing with troubleshooting. I may circle back around and get to them if I can but I am shooting to try to get all the other stuff done. Besides, I am sure if you have gotten this far – you have had at least a couple problems and have at least a rudimentary knowledge of troubleshooting (REBOOT ALL THE THINGS!! J ).

Looking to try to keep the momentum going we are going to discuss the following topics:

  • Identify ESXi Auto Deploy requirements
  • Configure Auto Deploy
  • Explain PowerCLI cmdlets for Auto Deploy
  • Deploy/Manage multiple ESXi hosts using Auto Deploy

Identify ESXi Auto Deploy requirements

Generally, as sysadmins, we don’t like to do the same thing over and over again. I am not saying we are lazy (some of us are J) but let’s face it, there are much cooler things to learn and do than load a system and put a config on it a couple of hundred times. So for those people, VMware has offered up Auto Deploy and Host Profiles. We will go over Host Profiles in the next objective point of 8, so don’t worry.

We will start off by explaining just what Auto Deploy does. Auto Deploy is a vSphere component that uses PXE boot infrastructure in conjunction with vSphere host profiles to provision and customize one to hundreds of hosts. No state is stored on the ESXi box itself, it is held by Auto Deploy. Now you don’t necessarily HAVE to use Host Profiles, but it does make you job a lot easier once it’s setup. You can even deploy different images such as versions and driver loads to different servers, based on criteria you specify.

We will now list the requirements, as it is always good to begin with those:

  1. The Hosts you are going to provision need to be setup in BIOS mode (not UEFI)
  2. If you are going to use VLANs make sure that is all setup prior and there is connectivity
  3. Verify you have enough storage for the Auto Deploy repository (Best Practice is to allow about 2GB for 4 images)
  4. DHCP server
  5. TFTP server
  6. Admin privileges to the DHCP server
  7. While not a requirement, it would be a good idea to setup a remote syslog server and ESXi Dump Collector in case things go wrong.
  8. PXE does not support IPv6 so make sure you have IPv4 (PXE doesn’t support it, specifically)

How do we configure it?

Configure Auto Deploy

  1. Install the vCenter Windows app or VCSA
  2. You will need to start up the Auto Deploy service
    1. You will need to log into your Web Client
    2. Click on Administration
    3. Under System Configuration, click Services
    4. Select Auto Deploy and select Edit Startup Type
    5. On Windows the service is disabled – select Manual or Automatic to enable it
    6. On the VCSA the service is set to Manual by default, you can select Automatic to have it start unassisted
  3. Configure the TFTP server (there are many different ones to choose from)
    1. In the Web Client go to the Inventory List and select your vCenter server System
    2. Click the Manage tab, select Settings, and click Auto Deploy
    3. Click Download TFTP Boot zip to download the configuration file and unzip the file to the directory in which your TFTP server stores files.
  4. Setup your DHCP server to point to the TFTP server where you just downloaded the config files.
    1. Specify the TFTP server’s IP address in the DHCP server using Option 66 (also called next-server)
    2. Specify the boot file name which is undionly.kpxe.vmw-hardwired in the DHCP option 67 (also called boot-filename)
  5. Set each host you want to provision with Auto Deploy to network boot or PXE boot.
  6. Locate the image profile you want to use and the depot it is located
  7. Write a rule that assigns an image profile to hosts

Next you are going to need to install PowerCLI to be able to create rules that assigns the image profile and optionally a host profile.

Explain PowerCLI cmdlets for Auto Deploy

Help is always just a command away by just typing Get-Help<cmdlet>. Also remember that Powershell isn’t case sensitive and you can tab to complete. You can also clean up output using Format-List or Format-Table. Now.. the commands:

Connect-VIServer 192.x.x.x – This command will, as you might have guessed, connect you to the vCenter that you plan to use for Auto Deploy. The IP address will need to be changed to yours. This command might return a certificate error. This is normal in development environments.

Add-EsxSoftwareDepot <c:\location.zip> – This will add the image profile to the PowerCLI session that you are in so that you can work with it.

Get-EsxImageProfile – This will list out the Image Profiles that are included in the zip that you are using. Usually there are a couple of them in there that may include VMware Tools and one that does not.

New-DeployRule –Name “testrule” –Item “My Profile25” –Pattern “vendor=Acme,Dell”, “ipv4=192.168.1.10-192.168.1.20” – This is a little meatier. This is creating a rule with the name “testrule” that is going to use the image profile “My Profile25” and will only be applied to a system from either Acme or Dell that is using an ip address in the range from 192.168.1.10-20. Double quotes are required if there are spaces, otherwise they are optional. You can specify –AllHosts instead of pattern to just carpet bomb your machines. If you have a host profile to add to it you can do so with the –Item <name of profile> and it will apply this profile to those hosts.

Add-DeployRule testrule – This adds the rule to the active rule set.

That is all the rules you have to have to have. But there are some more that you might find useful with Auto Deploy. They include

Get-DeployRule – This will get all current rules

Copy-DeployRule –DeployRule <name of rule> -ReplaceItem MyNewProfile – This will copy a rule and change the profile. You cannot edit a rule after it is added. You have to copy and replace.

Deploy/Manage multiple ESXi hosts using Auto Deploy

The beauty of the above is that you can use it for multiple ESXi hosts. I mean that is what it was really meant to be used for. You also have the ability of load balancing the TFTP servers to help distribute the load.

And that’s all I will write on this objective. Next stop, 8.2

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